A Mexican Breakfast Perfect for Diabetics (Little Glucose Spike!)




Type 2 Diabetes – Is It Possible to Snack Healthily Most of The Time?

There are many ways to approach healthy snacking. Based on what you know and what you have heard, it may seem as if it is almost impossible to snack in a healthy manner. The word “snack” may already have a negative connotation particularly to those who are trying to lose weight or lower their blood sugar. Rarely is snacking done right – which is worrying for adults who are looking at improving their health. We agree it is not easy. Having little more than fruit or raw vegetables to choose from is far from the most satisfying way to snack. Most of us are used to having tasty treats during our afternoon or evening. It is hard to get rid of such a pleasurable habit just because our health demands it.

Type 2 Diabetes – Social Support Has Been Found Helpful In Preventing Diabetes

Social support helps to prevent many illnesses, and according to the journal Diabetic Medicine, published in January 2016, Type 2 diabetes is one of them. Scientists at the German Research Center for Environmental Health and several other research facilities in Germany, compared participants with good and poor social support over a period of 25 years. They found those with poor social support were more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes.

Type 2 Diabetes – At The End Of the Day, Eating Healthily Is Essential to Reversing Diabetes

We know you need no introduction to the fact it is important to eat well. Is it something that could be overstated? We certainly think not. The importance of eating healthily bears repeating time and time again. It could be because most people simply are not on the same page. Despite the best efforts of well-intentioned medical professionals and advisers, the average person in modern society continues to eat poorly. Unhealthy diets are as much an epidemic as obesity and Type 2 diabetes. And it is often an individual’s nutrition that is primarily responsible for the development of these man-made diseases.

Type 2 Diabetes – Is A Ketogenic Diet Helpful For Those Dealing With Diabetes?

If you are looking for an effective eating plan to better manage your Type 2 diabetes, you might be considering trying the ketogenic diet. Some of you may have heard of this approach before while others may not. Essentially, this diet is one of the lowest carb approaches you can take. The carbohydrate intake is brought down to just 5% or fewer of your total calorie intake, and the remainder of the calories will come from 30% dietary protein and 65% dietary fat. So you could very easily call this a high-fat eating plan. Sounds interesting, right? Since watching your carbs is what controlling your blood sugar levels is all about, it may seem like a good protocol. But before you jump on the bandwagon, there are a few important points to think about.

Type 2 Diabetes – Does Smoking and Low Vitamin D Levels Cause Problems During Pregnancy?

Keeping up good nutrition plus not smoking are important during any pregnancy. Mothers and their fetus need vitamin D to keep up healthy levels of calcium and phosphate. Calcium and phosphate are two minerals necessary for healthy bones. And smoking lowers the amount of oxygen reaching the fetus. Several studies have shown the importance of adequate vitamin D levels to help prevent Gestational (pregnancy-related) diabetes. Now scientists at Dalhousie University in Halifax and several other institutions in Canada have found smoking worsens the relationship between a vitamin D deficiency and Gestational diabetes.

Fight Diabetes by Eating Certain Types of Food

The truth is there’s no miracle food that will fight type 2 diabetes. There are wise food choices though that can help in avoiding the disease, especially if you combine these choices with exercise.

Type 2 Diabetes – Many Modern Day Diseases Are Man-Made

When it comes to diseases, there are predominantly two ways they can be categorized: those that are man-made and those capable of afflicting us regardless of our influence. That being said, there is some overlap between these categories. Various conditions can surface because we are predisposed to them and because we facilitated its development. Type 2 diabetes is a good example. You may be at risk because it runs in your family but also because you lead an unhealthy lifestyle.

Type 2 Diabetes – Are Dental Implants Suitable for Diabetics With Poorly Controlled Blood Sugar?

One danger of having dental implants is developing an infection which goes on to affect the gums. Infection around the base of the crown which is supported by the implant is often caused due to food being caught around where they join. It usually depends on the shape and location of the teeth. When infection occurs, implants often need to be replaced. Replacement is expensive, painful, and inconvenient. People diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes and who have poorly-controlled blood sugar levels are at risk for oral infections, but surprisingly enough, not those that complicate dental implants.

Type 2 Diabetes – The Least Common Causes of Diabetes

You are likely familiar with some of the causes of Type 2 diabetes. You may know a little about this form of diabetes or be very aware of the latest regarding new medications, and the strategies for coping with the psychological and social challenges. Regardless of your background, let us focus on the least common causes of Type 2 diabetes. These do not receive much attention: they are overshadowed by the main culprits, which you are likely acquainted with already.

Type 2 Diabetes – Preventing Full-Blown Diabetes in Women Following Pregnancy

Gestational or pregnancy-related diabetes raises the risk for both mother and baby developing Type 2 diabetes further down the track. In April of 2016, the Mexican Gynecology Journal reported on a study of 671 Gestational diabetes cases. Over a period of 18 years, 10.3 percent of the participants developed full-blown Type 2 diabetes. The following raised the risk: age under 27 or over 35, a Body Mass Index (BMI) of more than 30 (obese), having high blood pressure of pregnancy, insulin therapy, poor blood sugar control, and complications in the pregnancy other than Gestational diabetes.

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